Home Studios – The Best Way To Demo Your Band!

 Home Studios – The Best Way to Demo Your Band!

If you’re in a band you’ll know that you will only get so far without demos. After a bit of live gigging you’ll be feeling match fit and that’s the time to start thinking about getting some demos done. If you have already spent some time looking into this then you’ll know the costs involved. Hiring a studio for the day is expensive and that’s before you add on the extra costs for example an engineer and producer. Assuming you can get it all done in a day (which will be a battle in itself) you’ll then have to pay for the track or tracks to be mixed and mastered and finally produced. It’s a big exercise and one that not many bands can afford without financial backing.

The way forward is to do it yourself! Your set up costs won’t be anything near as much as getting it done professionally. Ok it may be flawed but the people who are going to listen are going to know you’re on a budget so they will make allowances for that. The beauty of doing it this way is that once you are set you can record as much as you like at a pace that suits you. You’ll be far more relaxed when you’re not on a deadline. Here’s how to get started:

What You’ll Need

You’ll need some audio recording software such as Cubase or ProTools. If you’re on a real budget you can find free downloads of similar software without as many bells and whistles. Then you’ll need some decent microphones. The drum kit will need to be mic’d up (with a bass mic in the bass drum) and any instruments without Direct Inputs will need ambient microphones. The one thing you should really invest in is a really good quality vocal condenser mic, as the clarity of your vocals is really important. Guitars can be plugged into a mixing desk (which you probably already have if you have your own PA). Once you’ve got all this you’re pretty much good to go!

The Room

There’s another thing to think about before you start though. You’ll need to record in a room that is suitable. Some people use garages or rooms that aren’t used much – the last thing you want is loads of people coming in and out. Lock the doors so you are not disturbed and it’s really important that you get some insulation foam up on the walls. This will act as a sound-proofer so your neighbours won’t get too angry, and it will also soak up any echoes meaning you will get a much dryer sound to record with.

Once you’ve got your room and all your gear ready it’s time to get that epic album down on record! Start by laying down the drums, bass and guide vocals. Add in the guitars once by one and when you’re totally happy then throw the proper vocals (making sure you remove the guide!). Get it mixed, mastered and produced and start selling it (and start paying off the gear!).

Attached Images:

The contributor of this post, Sam Wellback, is a music producer and likes to reach out to his audience through his blogs. He likes to write about ways to record demo songs at home. He also shares factors that should be kept in mind while recording, such as insulation of the recording room and prerequisite audio recording software like Cubase or Pro Tools etc.





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Guitar made out of Hockey Sticks?

Finally there’s another use for all those broken hockey sticks filing up Canadian landfill sites across the nation: custom-made guitars! Brant, remember when you broke that $200 hockey stick when you tried out for the Brockville Braves (congrats for making the team BTW), tell your dad not to get so upset and just pick it up and make a guitar instead of throwing it out!

Hockey stick guitar The Canadian guitar Luther, Vincent Latulippe, makes one of a kind custom-made guitars and created from all of those broken hockey sticks. He first exposed the world to his unique recycling plans when showcasing it off at the 2009 Montreal Guitar Show. One of his very cool creation can be yours now on eBay with a “Buy It Now” listed at $1,900.

Here is the item description on eBay.

This guitar is made with used hockey sticks except for the central one, which is laminated with mahogany to make the neck.

The back of the headstock have also been reinforced with mahogany to obtain rigidity and the desired thickness. The hockey sticks used in this project have been played with and have some marks on them and have been lacquered after assembly.

Keep on Playin’ CAR!!!!!

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Larrivee plant tours part II

Now I’d like to complete the final part of a post I did a while ago about a guided video tour of the Larrivee plant. If your a serious or casual guitarist, you might find some neat answers to questions about how they make acoustic guitars. Enjoy!

In video 4 @ 01:13, they talk about all the parts of the neck of a guitar. The way they carve the neck is a craftsmanship at it’s best. I was amazed at how many parts of it that has names attached to them. Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks or words! The prep work before painting is neat as well as the technique itself. The finishing part that Larrivee uses in this section is called a UV finish. They use to use a lacquer finish now but took around 2 weeks to dry properly. The new stuff cures in a minute and a half in comparison to 2 weeks for the older finish. I wonder if the new finish they apply affects the guitar’s tone, even a little bit? If you know this answer, I’d love to here from you.

In video 5, they show a technician using wood shims while installing the neck of the guitar to the body. I just thought it would size up perfectly but for a supper snug fit, I can see how shims come in handy @ 01:52. The way the neck is glued onto the body has to be a bit stressful for the technician. This is brought to us @ 03:28. It has to be perfect or otherwise and little problems at this part of the process will be magnified at the end. If the friction fit dove tail section is not match perfect, I think that there you got some explaining to do! Near the end of this last video, at the final polishing/buffing stage, I was hoping that the guy was going to show us what might happen if he launches a guitar when using the buffing wheel. That would be priceless! At my second jewelry job, I did that launching thing once while polishing a necklace for a boss of mine and I mangled the hell out of it. it can honestly be quite dangerous.

Here are the remaining links to complete the Larrivee Plant Tour.

Part 4, and 5.

To finish off the tour I thought that I’d add video of the man himself Jean Larrivee the genius behind the Larrivee.

Keep on Jammin’

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